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Iowa honey production falls 17 percent

June 9, 2014
USDA-NASS

By USDA-National

Agricultural Statistics Service

IOWA

Honey production from producers with five or more colonies in Iowa totaled 1.87 million pounds in 2013.

This was a 17 percent decrease from the 2.26 million pounds produced in 2012.

The number of honey-producing colonies in the state rose from 37,000 colonies last year to 39,000 colonies in 2013.

This number does not include producers with fewer than five colonies or producers who did not harvest honey.

Colonies that produced honey in more than one state were counted in each state where they produced honey.

Yield per colony in Iowa averaged 48 pounds, down from 61 pounds per colony in 2012.

Iowa moved to 19th place nationally in honey production, down from 17th last year.

On Dec. 15, 2013, producer honey stocks in Iowa, excluding stocks under government loan programs, were 1.22 million pounds, a 2 percent decrease from 2012.

The state's 2013 honey crop was valued at $4.76 million, down 3 percent from the previous year's $4.9 million.

The average price per pound for all marketing channels in Iowa was $2.54, up 37 cents from 2012

U.S.

Honey production in 2013 from producers with five or more colonies totaled 149 million pounds, up 5 percent from 2012.

There were 2.64 million colonies producing honey in 2013, up 4 percent from 2012.

Yield per colony averaged 56.6 pounds, up 1 percent from the 56 pounds in 2012.

Colonies which produced honey in more than one state were counted in each state where the honey was produced.

Therefore, at the United States level yield per colony may be understated, but total production would not be impacted.

Colonies were not included if honey was not harvested.

Producer honey stocks were 38.2 million pounds on Dec. 15, 2013, up 20 percent from a year earlier.

Stocks held by producers exclude those held under the commodity loan program.

Record high prices

Honey prices increased to a record high during 2013 to 212.1 cents per pound, up 6 percent from 199.2 cents per pound in 2012.

United States and state-level prices reflect the portions of honey sold through cooperatives, private and retail channels.

Prices for each color class are derived by weighting the quantities sold for each marketing channel.

Prices for the 2012 crop reflect honey sold in 2012 and 2013.

Some 2012 crop honey was sold in 2013, which caused some revisions to the 2012 crop prices.

 
 

 

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