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Unusual and delicious

Break out of the traditional dessert molds for some deliciously different pies and cakes

June 22, 2018
By KELLSEY TRIMBLE - GRIT magazine , Farm News

By KELLSEY TRIMBLE

GRIT Magazine

Pie seems to be a widely regarded favorite in the category of desserts; warm filling tucked neatly into a buttery, flaky crust. A slice of cherry or peach is the perfect complement to a summer barbecue, and a dollop of ice cream atop warm apple pie has autumn written all over it. Every once in a while, though, I like to try a little something different, and that's where the following recipes come in.

Article Photos


Elderberry pie, shown here is full of nutrients from the elderberry juice. The juice can be found in health-food stores.

Because of my ridiculous sweet tooth, I'm a big fan of the beet chocolate cake. Any time you can drop some of the sugar from a recipe and substitute some nutritious ingredients in there, that's alright in my book.

Along these same lines, the elderberry pie is full of nutrients from the elderberry juice. The juice can be found in health food stores, but if you made some of your own over the summer, even better.

The nuts in the walnut cranberry pie lend richness while the fresh cranberries add bursts of tartness. And it seems like lemon-flavored anything is often the first to go at any get-together. This shaker lemon pie makes for a delicious light dessert after a heavy holiday meal.

My favorite dessert below is the Griswold pie, which I grew up on. With a few of his own adjustments from the original recipe, my father would make this pie every Thanksgiving and Christmas. I used to think it was a family recipe, as we are distantly related to the Griswold cast iron creators. Years later, I realized the recipe came from the Griswold Inn in Essex, Connecticut, but I didn't love it any less.

Griswold pie

Yields 1 pie

6 ounces bittersweet chocolate chunks

9-inch pie shell, baked and cooled

1 1/2 cups pecan halves

1/4 cup butter

1/2 cup dark maple syrup

1/2 cup coconut sugar

2 large eggs, beaten

Heat oven to 325 degrees.

Spread chocolate chunks evenly over bottom of pie shell. Sprinkle pecan halves over chocolate. Set aside.

In 1-quart saucepan, melt butter over medium heat. Remove and let cool for 2 minutes. Stir in maple syrup, coconut sugar, and eggs.

Pour mixture over pecans and chocolate in pie shell, making sure pecans are completely covered.

Bake for 45 minutes, or until firm. Cool slightly, and serve warm.

Cranberry walnut pie

By Malorie Davis

Yields 2 pies.

4 eggs, slightly beaten

1/2 cup honey

1/4 cup molasses

1/4 cup maple syrup

1/4 cup butter, melted

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

2 tablespoons bourbon

Zest and juice of 1 orange

1/4 teaspoon cinnamon

Pinch of cloves

Pinch of salt

4 cups fresh cranberries, divided

2 cups roughly chopped walnuts, divided

2 9-inch pie shells, baked and cooled

Vanilla or pumpkin ice cream, optional

Preheat oven to 425 degrees.

In large mixing bowl, combine eggs, honey, molasses, maple syrup, butter, vanilla extract, bourbon, orange zest and juice, cinnamon, cloves, and salt. Mix thoroughly, and set aside.

Place 2 cups cranberries and 1 cup walnuts in each pie shell. Top each with half the egg mixture, covering cranberries and walnuts.

Bake for 10 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 350 F, and continue baking for another 35 minutes.

Cool slightly before serving. Serve with ice cream, if desired.

Note: If preferred, sparkling cranberry juice can be used in place of the bourbon.

Shaker lemon pie

By Millicent Souris

Yields 6 to 8 servings.

3 lemons

2 cups granulated sugar

Prepared pastry for single pie crust, thoroughly chilled

4 whole eggs, room temperature

3/4 cup packed brown sugar

1 teaspoon kosher salt

1 egg white

Whipped cream or ice cream, optional

With mandolin, slice lemons as thinly as possible, while making sure they keep their shape. If there are seeds in the slices, gently push them out with a knife. Place lemon slices in small bowl and mix gently with granulated sugar. Cover and refrigerate overnight.

The next day, preheat oven to 425 degrees. Lightly grease 10-inch pie plate; set aside.

Roll out chilled pastry to form 15-inch-diameter circle about 1/8 inch thick. Place pastry in prepared pie pan. Trim edges, leaving 1/4-inch overhang. Lift and crimp overhang along rim of pie pan. Chill pie crust in freezer for 20 minutes or in refrigerator for 30 minutes so the fat in the pastry gets firm again.

Place large sheet of aluminum foil over pie plate. Gently push down onto bottom crust, leaving enough foil to loosely fold over edges so they don't burn. Place some baking beans over foil and level them out. Bake for 20 minutes. Remove from oven and reduce oven temperature to 375 degrees. Carefully lift edges of foil and remove foil and beans. Put crust back in oven and bake for an additional 7 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 350 degrees, cover edges with foil, and bake for another 7 to 8 minutes, or until crust is set and center is very light in color but not shiny. Remove from oven and let cool for 10 minutes.

In medium bowl, whisk whole eggs until completely homogenized. Add brown sugar and salt, and mix well.

In small bowl, whip egg white. Brush mixture over bottom and sides of cooled crust. Layer lemon slices flush with sides, forming circle.

Pour any remaining sugar mixture from lemons into egg mixture, and whisk to blend. Pour over lemon slices in pie plate.

Bake for 30 minutes, then rotate pie plate 180 degrees. Continue baking for another 30 minutes. To test doneness, give it a shake. If done, it should move solidly throughout with just a loose jiggle in the middle, which will set up as it cools. Let cool for 1 hour.

Serve with whipped cream or ice cream, if desired.

Beet chocolate cake

By Lovina Eicher and Kevin Williams

Yields 8 to 12 servings.

1 3/4 cups all-purpose flour

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

1 1/2 cups granulated sugar

3 large eggs

1 cup cooking oil

1 1/2 cups cooked, pureed fresh beets

1 cup semi-sweet chocolate chips, melted

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Sifted powdered sugar, for sprinkling

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter 9-by-13-inch cake pan; set aside.

In medium bowl, mix together flour, salt, and baking soda; set aside.

In large bowl, combine sugar, eggs, and oil. Stir vigorously or mix on medium speed with electric mixer for 2 minutes. Add beets, melted chocolate, and vanilla. Beat until thoroughly blended. Gradually add dry ingredients to beet mixture, beating well after each addition.

Pour batter into prepared pan. Bake for 40 to 45 minutes, or until toothpick inserted in center of cake comes out clean. Cool in pan. Cover and let stand overnight to improve flavor.

Sprinkle with powdered sugar before serving. Store cake in sealed container or cake safe, and it will stay fresh for 3 to 4 days.

Elderberry pie

By Jo Ann Gardner

Yields 6 to 8 servings.

4 tablespoons flour

1 cup sugar, or to taste

1/4 teaspoon salt

1 cup milk, divided

1 cup elderberry juice

1 egg, separated

9-inch pie shell, unbaked

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

In large bowl, combine flour, sugar, and salt. Stir in enough milk to make a paste.

In saucepan, bring elderberry juice to boil. Stir paste into hot juice. Simmer, stirring often to prevent lumps. Remove from heat and stir in remaining milk to cool mixture. Stir in egg yolk.

In bowl, beat egg white until stiff. Fold into juice mixture. Pour mixture into pie shell and bake for about 30 minutes.

Excerpted from Grit, Celebrating Rural America Since 1882. To read more articles from Grit, please visit www.grt.com or call (866) 624-9388 to subscribe.

Copyright 2018 by Ogden Publications Inc.

 
 

 

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