×
×
homepage logo

CLAYTON RYE

By Staff | Jul 4, 2014

I was standing in line when I remembered how much I dislike (what else) standing in line.

My wife wanted to stop at a hamburger place she had heard of and we have never been to.

We had our grandson with us so it was a chance to try a variation of a familiar food.

It was so popular there was a line of people out the door and onto the sidewalk waiting to get in.

We got in line and I made an exception to one of my rules that if a restaurant is so popular you have to wait to get in, then they have enough business and I will find another place that offers good food, does not have a line and would appreciate my business.

I have nothing against successful businesses. I figure there are similar businesses who are eager to show me what they can do and need the income.

If they disappoint me, then there won’t be a second visit.

I believe in capitalism, and I vote with my feet and my dollars.

However, my wife wanted to eat at the establishment for a couple reasons so we waited about 30 minutes for a table and 15 minutes for our food.

Yes, it was very good ,which explained all the customers.

That and all those awards hanging on the wall that went back 15 years telling of its accomplishments.

We had a similar event happen in Buffalo, Wyo., when we decided to eat at a cafe that seemed to be promising. When we got there we were told it would be a 20-minute wait.

I looked across the parking lot and saw a smaller building that looked to be a former fast food place and was now privately owned.

Rather than wait we walked across the parking lot and stepped inside to a place that specialized in barbecued ribs.

We placed our order and ate some of the most delicious ribs we have ever had. I did not associate Buffalo, Wyo., as a place for ribs, but it was.

When traveling through Buffalo a few years later, we stopped there again and they were still the best.

There are lines we wait in by choice and those we just have to wait such as during road construction.

Lines are usually a sign of a problem meaning that supply is less than demand and a shortage exists.

Capitalism does have its faults, but show me something better that actually works.

Waiting 45 minutes for a hamburger does seem to me questionable when there are hamburgers available at any place serving food.

However, matrimonial harmony is also valuable, probably bordering on priceless.

In the long run, a $10 hamburger could be cheap when weighed against spousal satisfaction.

I’ve spent $10 in other places and had less to show than the hamburgers my wife, grandson and I enjoyed along with a room full of people while more waited to get in.

Having been there once, I do not feel the need to go back. I am quite sure they won’t miss me.

And the people who would have been in line behind us will get their table and food a little quicker.

Rye is a Farm News staff writer and farmer from Hanlontown. Reach him by e-mail at crye@wctatel.net.

Please Enter Your Facebook App ID. Required for FB Comments. Click here for FB Comments Settings page